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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 30-33

Removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates


1 Department of Periodontics, University of Benin, Nigeria
2 Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Lagos, Nigeria

Date of Web Publication26-Sep-2012

Correspondence Address:
C C Azodo
Department of Periodontics,New Dental Complex,University of Benin Teaching Hospital,P.M.B. 1111 Ugbowo, Benin City, Edo State 300 001
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-9626.101353

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  Abstract 

Objective: To determine the self-reported prevalence of removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four hundred non-dental undergraduates of University of Benin recruited over four week's period were studied. Results: The prevalence of removable partial denture use among the respondents was 1.8%. Denture use was more among those aged 17-25 years, females and right handed individuals. Removable partial denture users were less likely to have received professional instruction on tooth brushing and brush their teeth more than once-daily than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were more likely to be cigarette smokers, regular soft drink consumer and report perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental diseases than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were also more likely to have opened bottled drink with their teeth and experienced shocking sensation from their teeth than non-denture users. Conclusion: The prevalence of removable partial denture use was low among the respondents. The denture wearer were more likely to report higher perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental disease despite indulgence in unhealthy oral health practices and lower receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing. The implication of this study is that dental practitioner should endeavor to give oral health instruction to removable partial denture users to improve their oral health practices and decrease the risk of preventable oral diseases.

Keywords: Oral health practices, removable denture, undergraduates


How to cite this article:
Azodo C C, Akinboboye B. Removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates. Eur J Gen Dent 2012;1:30-3

How to cite this URL:
Azodo C C, Akinboboye B. Removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates. Eur J Gen Dent [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 May 20];1:30-3. Available from: http://www.ejgd.org/text.asp?2012/1/1/30/101353


  Introduction Top


Tooth loss due to dental caries has been on the increase in Nigeria due to dietary changes, poor oral health awareness and practices. [1],[2] The lost teeth are usually replaced by fixed or removable prosthesis. Removable dentures are the most commonly used prosthesis in developing countries because they are cheaper and easier to fabricate. The replacement of principally anterior teeth even when posterior teeth are missing is the established pattern of replacement of missing teeth among patient population in Nigeria implying that most individuals seeking denture replacement may do so, more for aesthetic than masticatory reasons. [3]

Studies in Nigeria among young individuals revealed that the decayed component is the dominant contributor to the Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) index while the missing component contributes a small proportion. [4],[5] However it is expected that the replacement of missing teeth among young individuals will be motivated by aesthetic and phonation reasons in order to facilitate their social interaction at work and school, and coping with daily living. The studies on removable dentures in Nigeria have been predominantly conducted in the dental clinic neglecting field based studies thus this is a pioneering study. The objective of the study was to determine the self-reported prevalence of removable denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates.


  Materials and Methods Top


A total of four hundred (400) non-dental undergraduates of University of Benin recruited at three entry and exit points of the Ugbowo campus of the University over four weeks period were studied with interviewer-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire elicited information on demography, self-reported denture use, daily tooth brushing frequency, receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing, cigarette smoking, soft drink consumption, the use of teeth to open bottled drinks, shocking sensation from teeth, perceived self-efficacy in oral self-care and preventing gingivodental diseases. Those undergraduates in a hurry, almost late to lecture and refused to be interviewed were excluded from this survey. The objective of the study was explained to the participants and informed consent obtained before the interview. The obtained data were subjected to descriptive statistics (frequency, percentages and cross tabulation) using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 17.0. For the purpose of analysis the responses on age, the daily tooth brushing frequency and soft drink consumption were categorised into two namely 17-25 years and 26-35 years, ≤once-daily and >once-daily, regular and non-regular consumers respectively.


  Results Top


Age, gender and ethnicity distribution of the respondents were 17-25 years-233 (58.3%) and 26-35 years-167 (41.7%), male-201 (50.3%) and female-199 (49.8%) respectively. The majority 382 (95.5%) of the respondents reported their dominant hand as right hand [Table 1]. The prevalence of removable partial denture use among the respondents was 1.8% [Table 2]. Denture use was more among those aged 17-25 years, females and right handed individuals [Table 3]. Removable partial denture users were less likely to have received professional instruction on tooth brushing and indulge in more than once-daily tooth brushing than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were more likely to be cigarette smokers, consume soft drink regularly and report perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental diseases than non-denture users [Table 4]. Denture users were also more likely to have opened bottled drink with their teeth and experienced shocking sensation than non-denture users [Table 4].
Table 1: Survey respondents' characteristics

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Table 2: Prevalence of denture use among the respondents

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Table 3: The relationship between demographic characteristics and prevalence of denture use among the respondents

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Table 4: The relationship between denture use and oral health practices among the respondents

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  Discussion Top


The provision of removable prostheses constitutes a significant part of most dental practices. [6] In this study, the self-reported prevalence of removable partial denture use among the respondents was 1.8%. This is low in comparison with few studies that revealed the prevalence of denture wear and usage. [7],[8] This substantiated the fact that denture wearers are majorly in the older age groups. [9] The low contribution of missing component to DMFT in Nigeria is a contributory explanation. [1],[4],[5] Removable partial denture use was more among those aged 17-25 years, females and right handed individuals in this study. This reflects the fact that younger people and females are more conscious of their appearance and would replace their missing teeth with the most commonly cost-effective prosthesis available. Our finding is consistent with reports of more removable denture use among females than males among patients that attended Aracatuba Dental School and adults in Sweden. [10],[11]

The dominant hand is increasing found to be a factor in oral conditions like traumatic injuries and recurrent aphthous stomatitis [12],[13] and this result should be archived amongst them but further investigation to ascertain any relationship between edentulism and dominant hand among individual is recommended.

Removable partial denture users were less likely to brush their teeth more than once-daily than non-denture users. This could be explained by the fact that denture users in comparison non denture users in this study were lesser likely to have received professional instruction on tooth brushing. Removable partial denture users were more likely to be regular soft drink consumer, smoke cigarette and open bottled drink with their teeth which have adverse effect on soft and hard tissue of the mouth suggesting the increased chances of having oral health complaints as exemplified by higher report of dentinal sensitivity. These findings confirm Murtomaa et al,[14] assertation that denture wearers should be a special target group for dental health education.

In this study, denture users reported higher perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental diseases than non-denture users. This perceived belief may unfortunately trigger the denture user into the continuation of poor health practices, lessening their receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing and attendant consequences of further tooth loss.


  Conclusion Top


The prevalence of removable denture use was low among the respondents. Removable denture wearers were more likely report higher perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental disease despite indulgence in unhealthy oral health practices and lower receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing. The implication of this study is that dental practitioner should endeavour to give oral health instruction to denture users to improve their oral health practices and decrease the risk of preventable oral diseases.

 
  References Top

1.Oginni FO. Tooth loss in a sub-urban Nigerian population: Causes and pattern of mortality revisited. Int Dent J 2005;55:17-23.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.Adeyemo WL, Oderinu HO, Oluseye SB, Taiwo OA, Akinwande JA. Indications for extraction of permanent teeth in a Nigerian teaching hospital: A 16-year follow-up study. NigQ J Hosp Med 2008;18:128-32.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Ehikhamenor EE, Oboro HO, Onuora OI, Umanah AU, Chukwumah NM, Aivboraye IA.Types of removable prostheses requested by patients who were presented to the University of Benin Teaching Hospital Dental Clinic. J Dent Oral Hyg 2010;2:15-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Okeigbemen SA. The prevalence of dental caries among 12 to 15-year-old school children in Nigeria: Report of a local survey and campaign. Oral Health Prev Dent 2004;2:27-31.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.Adekoya-Sofowora CA, Nasir WO, Oginni AO, Taiwo M. Dental caries in 12-year-old suburban Nigerian school children. Afr Health Sci 2006;6:145-50.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    
6.Coates AJ, Moore KR, Richards LC. Removable prosthodontics: A survey of practices and attitudes among South Australian dentists. Aust Dent J 1996;41:151-8.  Back to cited text no. 6
[PUBMED]    
7.Hummel SK, Wilson MA, Marker VA, Nunn ME. Quality of removable partial dentures worn by the adult U.S. population. J Prosthet Dent 2002;88:37-43.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.Zitzmann NU, Hagmann E, Weiger R. What is the prevalence of various types of prosthetic dental restorations in Europe? Clin Oral Implants Res 2007;18:20-33.  Back to cited text no. 8
[PUBMED]    
9.Ettinger RL, Beck JD, Jakobsen J. Removable prosthodontic treatment needs: A survey. J Prosthet Dent 1984;51:419-27.  Back to cited text no. 9
[PUBMED]    
10.Axéll T, Owall B. Prevalences of removable dentures and edentulousness in an adult Swedish population. Swed Dent J 1979;3:129-37.   Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.Pellizzer EP, Almeida DA, Falcón-Antenucci RM, Sánchez DM, Zuim PR, Verri FR. Prevalence of removable partial dentures users treated at the Aracatuba Dental School - UNESP Gerodontol 2012;29:140- 4.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.Canakci V, Akgul HM, Akgul N, Canakci CF. Prevalence and handedness correlates of traumatic injuries to the permanent incisors in 13-17-year-old adolescents in Erzurum, Turkey. Dent Traumatol 2003;19:248-54.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.Cicek Y, Canakci V, Ozgoz M, Ertas U, Canakci E. Prevalence and handedness correlates of recurrent aphthous stomatitis in the Turkish population. J Public Health Dent 2004;64:151-6.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.Murtomaa H, Könönen M, Laine P. Age and maintenance of removable dentures in Finland. J Oral Rehabil 1992;19:123-8.  Back to cited text no. 14
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4]



 

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Abstract
Introduction
Materials and Me...
Results
Discussion
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